Vaccinations

 
Canine Vaccination Information
 
Why is vaccination important?
All dogs are at risk of exposure to various infectious diseases, some of which are life-threatening while others, like Rabies, also pose a public health risk. Vaccination to prevent common infectious diseases supports the first goal of medicine, disease prevention. Prevention of infectious disease is more beneficial to your pet than treating disease once it occurs. The animal's natural immune system helps eliminate viral and bacterial infections. Thus, preventive vaccination is one of the most reliable and cost-effective methods of health care available to a pet owner.
 
How often should my dog be vaccinated?
Immunity to most infectious disease gradually declines, so periodic revaccination is generally necessary. Frequency of vaccination is dependent on your dog's lifestyle, age and risk of disease exposure. Your veterinarian can determine the appropriate vaccination interval based on your pet's history and individual circumstances.
 
What about potential risks of vaccination?
The benefits of vaccination are usually considered to far outweigh the relatively small risk of vaccine-related adverse effects. Allergic reactions to vaccination and local, injection-site irritation are uncommon, but they do occur. Your veterinarian can advise you of the possible risks associated with vaccination and the steps to take if vaccine-related reactions should occur.
 
Common Infectious Diseases of Dogs
The following infectious diseases of dogs can be prevented or lessened by vaccination. Please click on the following links for more information.
 
Rabies: A viral disease that can affect all warm blooded mammals.
Canine Distemper: A widespread, high-mortality viral disease of dogs
Infectious Canine Hepatitis: A worldwide disease effecting dogs which infects a wide range of tissues
Enteritis: Parvo-virus and coronavirus
Canine Respiratory Disease: A troublesome problem in dogs because it is easily transmitted in the air or by direct contact.
Leptospirosis: A bacterial disese that can be found in most animals, including livestock and wildlife.
Lyme Disease: A tick-borne disease.
 

 
Feline Vaccination Information
 
Why is vaccination important?
All cats are at risk of exposure to various infectious diseases, even if they spend most of their time indoors. Some infectious diseases are life-threatening while others, like Rabies, also pose a public health risk. Vaccination to prevent common infectious diseases supports the first goal of medicine - disease prevention. Prevention of infectious disease is more beneficial to your cat than treating disease once it occurs. The animal's natural immune system helps eliminate viral and bacterial infections. Thus, preventive vaccination is one of the most reliable and cost-effective methods of health care available to a pet owner.
 
How often should my cat be vaccinated?
Immunity to most infectious diseases gradually declines, so periodic revaccination is generally necessary. Frequency of vaccination is dependent on your cat's lifestyle, age and risk of disease exposure. Your veterinarian can determine the appropriate vaccination interval based on your pet's history and individual circumstances.
 
What about potential risks of vaccination?
The benefits of vaccination are usually considered to far outweigh the relatively small risk of vaccine-related adverse effects. Allergic reactions to vaccination and local, injection-site irritation are uncommon, but they do occur. Your veterinarian can advise you of the possible risks associated with vaccination and the steps to take if vaccine-related reactions should occur.
 
Common Infectious Diseases of Cats
The following infectious diseases of cats can be prevented or lessened by vaccination. Please click on the following links for more information.
 
Rabies: A viral disease that can affect all warm blooded mammals
Feline Panleukopenia: Also known as feline distemper
Feline Respiratory Disease: The great majority of feline respiratory disease result from two easily transmitted infections.
Feline Leukemia: A high-mortality disease caused by the feline leukemia virus.